8 Mental Health Support Workshops & Platforms To Help Singaporean Youths Cultivate Mental Wellness

5 minutes reading time (1011 words)

Mental health support groups

Mental health support workshops

Feeling like you want to hide under your bedsheets the entire day isn’t an uncommon plight - some call it Monday blues. But if this overwhelming feeling of meh-ness drags on longer, it becomes a major cause for concern.

Whether it’s mild depression or you’re going out of your mind with stress, here are 8 support services you can rely on:

 

1. Silver Ribbon (Singapore) - mental wellness workshops & free counselling services 

 

Silver Ribbon - mental wellness workshops

They occasionally hold fun events like this life-sized Snakes & Ladders game
Image credit: Silver Ribbon Singapore

Mental health issues aren’t widely discussed in Singapore, but Silver Ribbon (Singapore) tries to combat the stigma with counselling services and mental wellness workshops - these are customised according to the audience, which ranges from students to working adults and senior citizens. If you need someone to talk to, their complimentary counselling services are entirely confidential.

They also have a Youth Chapter programme that’s directly run by youths, to help and support those struggling with mental health issues.

Find out more about Silver Ribbon (Singapore).

 

2. CHAT - mental health checks & youth mental health talks

 

CHAT youth support

CHAT’s youth support team sharing more about their work in mental health support[a]
Image credit: CHAT

Community Health Assessment Team (CHAT) is the one-stop youth mental health resource for people between 16 and 30 years old. Instead of dismissing all your concerns as teenage angst - casually brushing it off with the overused phrase “you’ll understand when you’re older”, CHAT offers a wide array of mental health initiatives.

They genuinely want to help: they offer a confidential and personalised mental health check service - you can make your appointment here. This is a one-on-one consult with a mental health professional so you’ll get a better sense of your own mental wellbeing. If you’re not comfortable talking on the phone or face-to-face, there’s also a webCHAT available.

They often hold CHAT Talks that give a rundown on youth mental health concerns and disorders.

Find out more about CHAT.

 

3. The Tapestry Project - writing workshops & shared stories

 

There’s an air of genuinity that surrounds The Tapestry Project. It’s an online platform where people can share stories, their own personal struggles with mental health recovery. Whether it’s to Empower, Educate, or Connect - they’ve got them all. Try jotting down your thoughts: it’s one way to let go of all negative feelings, and you can even submit your stories here.

Its social enterprise re:story holds Writing Workshops, that act as journalling sessions, which create a safe space for participants to express their feelings. You’ll get a discount if you’re currently seeing a mental health specialist.

Find out more about The Tapestry Project

 

4. Over The Rainbow - self-help workshops & online resources

 

Mental health support - over the rainbow

Image credit: Over The Rainbow

Anyone could be battling a mental illness - Over The Rainbow understands just that. As an organisation founded by 2 parents, it’s fully supported by a group of volunteers who bonded through shared experiences to support others through their mental wellness journey.

Their Circle-of-Care is an online resource that you can use for your self-help journey. They also frequently have classes like The Instant Pause, a one-day urban retreat for reflection, and Release Your Grasp with Watercolour, Prayer & Essential Oils, a watercolour workshop. 

Find out more about Over The Rainbow.

 

5. Campus PSY - youth-led support group

 

Mental health support - Campus PSY

Image Credit: Youth.SG

It’s not easy confiding in strangers - especially if they’re generations apart. Campus PSY (Peer Support for Youths) provides a support group for those passionate in starting change in the Youth Mental Health space in Singapore.

Youth volunteers are trained in advocacy and equipped with basic mental health literacy and peer helping skills to better support fellow peers who might be in distress or suffering from mental health issues in school or at the workplace.

Find out more about Campus PSY.

 

6. Club HEAL - mental wellness centre & caregivers’ support group

 

As a mental health charity, Club HEAL provides counselling and rehabilitation services to anyone experiencing a mental health problem. They offer caregiver support group and corporate training to empower individuals and organisations in understanding mental health and wellbeing.

Find out more about Club HEAL.

 

7. Help123 - support from trained counsellors

 

Since we’re spending a ton of time online, there’s a likelihood that our online time isn’t all sunshine and rainbows - cyberbullying is becoming a serious threat for many young people. With Help123, youths can reach out to trained counsellors through multiple platforms: web-chat, phone, and email.  

Find out more about Help123.

 

8. Do You M.I.N.D.? - adventure-based VR learning

 

Do You M.I.N.D.

Trying out VR gadgets to learn more about mental health issues
Image credit: Do You M.I.N.D.?

As a mental wellness programme by TOUCH Youth Intervention, Do You M.I.N.D.? uses high-tech VR gadgets to educate youths on things like keeping a balanced lifestyle and looking out for symptoms of mental health issues. It also has intervention services such as counselling sessions and a support group called Upper Room.

Find out more about Do You M.I.N.D.?.

 

Mental health support services in Singapore

 

More often than not, we deal with our struggles silently. But the difference between a bad week and mental health issues? The latter can change your emotion, thinking, or behaviour and you have no say in the matter whatsoever.

Whatever it is, those dealing with these struggles should know that there is support out there. The National Youth Council’s Youth Conversations on Mental Health revealed that young people feel that more could be done to increase awareness on mental health issues, destigmatise mental health, and create a more inclusive society.  

There’s certainly no need to deal with mental health issues alone. Once you realise that there are many who care about creating change for the better, you may soon even realise you’ll be looking forward to Mondays a little more.

Get insights into Youth Conversations here


This post was brought to you by National Youth Council.

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